10th Anniversary Celebrations

December 1, 2016

On Rizal, the artist

by Johsa Manzanilla  (Published in Pilipino Express December 1-15)

On November 19, 2016, the Knights of Rizal (Winnipeg Chapter) hosted an event “Celebrating Rizal the Artist.” ANAK’s Director Johsa Manzanilla was invited to provide the reflection. The following are her remarks.

To begin, it is a privilege and an honour to be invited today by the Knights of Rizal to reflect and expound on such a topic as “Rizal the Artist.” As Levy [Abad] said, I am a musician, actor and performance artist. I sing, play a number of instruments, write my own songs, and perform on stage and in some film. As a young Filipina, I have found it a challenge to balance following my artistic passions and pursuits with making meaningful, tangible contributions to society. I want to add to real world change that has a measureable, positive impact. Moreover, I am aware that a career in the arts does not necessarily provide lucrative financial compensation.

Jose Rizal didn’t start out wanting to make change, wanting to make a difference in the world. He didn’t wake up one morning deciding that he would make the impact that he eventually did. What Rizal did do was live and follow his passions and interests.

November 1, 2016

Show us your #UNselfie!


From now until Nov. 29, get ready for Giving Tuesday by showing us your #UNselfie!

Simply print off one of our templates or create your own, snap a selfie with it, and tag ANAK when you post on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook!

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ANAK is a proud partner of Giving Tuesday Canada and we invite you to support Filipino-Canadian youth programming in Winnipeg. Give the gift that keeps on giving! Every little bit counts!

Visit our Partner Profile page to learn more.

October 1, 2016

Solidarity in identity and belonging

by Johsa Manzanilla  (Published in Pilipino Express October 1-15)

I first stumbled upon ANAK in 2009. I instantly fell in love.

It was summer, and I was having conversations with other Filipino-Canadians in Winnipeg, as they shared with me their thoughts on identity and belonging. At the time, I was a grad student in human rights and social justice, also personally struggling with my own sense of self as a young Filipina, trying to make sense of who I am and why I am in Canada. The school that I was studying at was in The Hague, Netherlands, so I had come back home for a month to research the social exclusion narratives of my community. Through this process, I met two other young, bright and energetic women who shared with me this conflict with identity and who grappled with the question of how we “fit” in – a push/pull between our “Filipino-ness” and “Canadian-ness.”